The Robin's Nest - May 2004
Streaming Videos from the Nest

 HowPeg 

Please note that these videos will require a high speed connection and Windows Media Player 

A Streaming Video of  Each Day beginning with  May11, 2004

I have found that Nature is full of  wonder , amazement, danger and especially surprises. Sometimes the surprises are pleasant but can just as well be startling and very unpleasant  depending on the point of view.  My intention, when I started this sequence, was to chronicle every day in the saga of this Robin Family until the young birds fledged .  Unfortunately  this was cut short with one of  Nature's surprises.

Foster Hollies  are a favorite nesting location for Robins and I found this one just after the eggs had been laid

The Nest Location

The Tall Holly Nearest the Porch

Camera in the Holly

 

All Rights Reserved- HL Greer

 
     

Read more about Robins Eggs at Journey North American Robins

May 11, 2004  

 

 

 

No Chicks Yet

 

The American Robin Incubation time is from 12 to 14 days

 

The X10 Camera was placed on May 11, 2004. I am not sure exactly when the eggs were laid and the Clutch was complete. Therefore not sure when the hatching will occur. Will attempt to document each day with a streaming video of the highlights of the day and hopefully will have the complete cycle from this point on.

 

Click on Robin Pictures for the Video

 

     

Read more about Robins Eggs at Journey North American Robins

May 12, 2004

 
 

Three Eggs revealed

 

The American Robin senses the temperature of the eggs through a bare spot on the breast produced by molting and the blood vessels under the bare spot both provide warmth for incubation and convey the information to the mother . This spot is called the "Brood patch"

The Last two days have been Sunny and Warm with temperatures in the mid 80's. The Female Robin is incubating the eggs  alone although the male is close by and waiting to assume his role in caring for the chicks when the blessed moment arrives. The mother spends most of the day on the eggs and turns them  many time. Today the third egg became visible on camera

 

Click on Robin Pictures for the Video

 
     
     

Journey North American Robins FAQs

May 13, 2004

 
 

Wind Rain and no hatching

 

The American Robin Mother like all bird mothers will rearrange the eggs in the nest many times a day. She does this with her beak and feet and is necessary to keep all the eggs and portions of the eggs at an even temperature as well as keeping the embryo from sticking to the shell.

 It  is Thursday with a little bit of rain and cooler temperatures . The Mother Robin's work continues.  Cover the Eggs, turn the eggs, and leave for eating for up to 15 minutes before returning. At times today the wind rocked the nest.
 

Click on Robin Pictures for the Video

 
     
     
Journey North American Robins FAQs

May 14, 2004

 
 

A Day Closer But No Cigar

 

On warm days the Robin Mother will  raise up in the nest to allow some cooling as there is perhaps more danger in the eggs becoming too warm than in cooling slightly. She also will be gone from the nest for longer periods in search for her own food on these warm days.

Today is Friday and at least so far today no hatching activity. Mothers do have to eat and this female robin snags a giant bug very close to the nest and then has a problem in devouring it. Finally succeeds though and resumes her clutch tending duties.

 

Click on Robin Pictures for the Video

 
     
 

May 15, 2004

 
 

Rainy  and Cool  And No Chicks

 

An American Robin can produce up to  three successful broods in one year. Only 40 percent of nests successfully produce young. 75 percent of  fledglings will not survive past  Summer. After the first year the mortality rate of robins is 50 percent per year. A lucky robin, however can live up to 14 years. 

A Rainy Cool Day and no hatching activity. The Mother Robin stayed on the nest much more today, leaving less frequently and retuning quickly. With a high temperature of only 60, the eggs cannot be uncovered very long. Somehow, someway, she knows this and adjust.

 

Click on Robin Pictures for the Video

 
     

Journey North American Robins FAQs

May 16, 2004

 
 

Cool Sunday and No Chicks

 

While the female Robin does all of the incubation duties, the male stays nearby. If on rainy or very cool days , the female will not leave due to the danger in the egg cooling, she will signal for attention and the male will bring food to the nest and feed the female.

The Work goes on. Today for the first time the female Robin gets support from the male. Since it was cool (55 degrees) this morning  the Mother to be stayed on the nest  to keep that egg temperature at 96 degrees. The male brought the catches of the day to her until it warmed up and it was safe for her to leave the eggs again.  No Hatching today but hopefully soon.

Journey North American Robins FAQs

Click on Robin Pictures for the Video

 
     
     

Journey North American Robins FAQs

May 17, 2004

 

The Home delivery value meal

Another Day without hatching but Cicada Comes a calling

 

Good Fortune comes to those who sit and wait. ( well sometimes anyway). While the chicks are still  not hatching today, Mother Robin gets an unexpected fast food delivery right to her nest. The 17 year Cicada appearance is in full swing and one of the 17 year old big eyed bugs gets a little too close

 

Click on Robin Pictures for the Video

 
     

Journey North American Robins FAQs

May 18, 2004

 

 

Warmer Today but No Hatching

 

Only The Female Incubates the Eggs which can be from 9 - 15 days although the usual time is 12-14 days. The Female also builds the nest which usually takes about 6 days. The male will help by bringing food to the female when necessary and sharing  feeding the chicks when they arrive. The Male will continue to feed the fledglings up to two weeks after they leave the nest.

A bit warmer today with temperatures in the 80's. Hour after hour our Mother Robin sits on the eggs , now turning them more frequently. Occasionally she will rise and let the eggs cool a bit sometimes just nearby watching. The Male is close by and his song can be heard. He has brought food to her only on the one cool and rainy day. On warm days she can leave for up to 15 minutes.

 

Click on Robin Pictures for the Video

 
 

 

 

Journey North American Robins FAQs

May 19, 2004

 

The X10 view in my office

Thunderstorms and no Hatching

 

Today is the ninth day the camera has been on the nest. Since I could not be sure how many days of incubation  had elapsed  at the time  I placed the camera and   since incubation time is 12-14 days, it seems to me that they must hatch if they are going to in the next two or three days

 

Click on Robin Pictures for the Video

 
     
Journey North American Robins FAQs

May 20, 2004

 
 

 Getting Close to crunch Time

 

An American Robin can produce up to  three successful broods in one year. Only 40 percent of nests successfully produce young. 75 percent of  fledglings will not survive past  Summer.

So once again  this will not be the hatch day . It does seem that  she moves the eggs around much more frequently but still no signs of  egg  shells cracking. She is still taking advantage of the 17 year Cicada phenomenon and nails any that venture close to the nest.

 

Click on Robin Pictures for the Video

 
     
 

May 21, 2004

 
Journey North American Robins FAQs  Today is Hatch Day But Joy is Short-lived  

The Last Day

Click on Robin Pictures for the Video

The First Chick struggles to free itself from it's shell. This was day 11 from the time I set the Camera. It was a day the Robin's were looking for and I must confess, so was I. It is a day of the miracle and then ---- Well for all those who like Happy endings, this is as far as you should go. I would have liked to have provided a video for the next 14 or 15 days as the Robin chicks grew and fledged. This cannot happen and now we are reminded once again why only 40 % of clutches ever make it. . For those who would like to see the final video click on the  Eden Lost link below . I am not putting it on this page  because it may be too harsh for some children and indeed some adults

To find out what happened next click on the link below

Eden-  Lost

 

 

 

 

 

 

Wildlife visiting our Louisville Kentucky Backyard

scroll and click for each bird or animal video, sound and or picture

 

 

Please Visit our other Robin Nesting Pages

Follow the latest Robin Nest Story on the Spring page of the Howpeg 2010 journal

Spring 

 

 

A new and current Robin nest undertaking  is in progress with four eggs. three of which have hatched as of  May 6, 2007. Click on the picture to go to the 2007 Journal for daily updates and Videos from the nest.

Click here to go to The 2003 Robin's Diary

Click here to to the 2005 Robin and Cardinal Nest BLOG

Click here to go to the 2006 Wildlife Diary

The 2008 Journal Two Robin Nest that end Tragically .

 

 

 

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